Category Archives: Tax Preparation

retiring overseas

Avoiding Tax Surprises When Retiring Overseas

retirement abroadAre you approaching retirement age and wondering where you can retire to make your retirement nest egg last longer? Retiring abroad may be the answer. But first, it’s important to look at the tax implications because not all retirement country destinations are created equal. Continue reading

529 plan

Saving for Education: Understanding 529 Plans

saving for collegeMany parents are looking for ways to save for their child’s education, and a 529 Plan is an excellent way to do so. Even better is that thanks to the passage of tax reform legislation in 2017, 529 plans are now available to parents wishing to save for their child’s K-12 education, as well as college (two and four-year programs) or vocational school. Continue reading

tax return deadline

Tax Return Tips for Last-Minute Filers

tax return timeEarlier is better when it comes to working on your taxes, but many people find preparing their tax return to be stressful and frustrating and wait until the last minute. Complicating matters this year is tax reform and the newly-redesigned Form 1040. If you’ve been procrastinating on filing your tax return this year, here are eight tips that might help. Continue reading

reviewing tax credits

Highlights of the American Rescue Plan Act

review tax documentsSigned into law on March 11, 2021, the American Rescue Plan Act (ARPA) contains several tax provisions affecting individuals and families. Let’s take a look: Continue reading

second home ownership

Renting Out a Second Home

second homeIn general, income from renting a vacation home for 15 days or longer must be reported on your tax return on Schedule E, Supplemental Income and Loss. You should also keep in mind that the definition of a “vacation home” is not limited to a house. Apartments, condominiums, mobile homes, and boats are also considered vacation homes in the eyes of the IRS. Tax rules on rental income from second homes can be confusing, especially if you rent the home out for several months of the year and use the home yourself. Continue reading

avoid an IRS audit

Avoiding an IRS Audit

IRS auditAlthough just 0.15 percent of taxpayers were audited in 2019, the fear of being audited is never far from many taxpayer’s minds, and with the taxes becoming more complicated every year, there’s an even greater possibility of confusion turning into a tax mistake… and an IRS audit. Avoiding “red flags” like the ones listed below, however, could help you avoid one. Continue reading

social security and taxes

Social Security Benefits and Taxes: The Facts

social securitySocial Security benefits include monthly retirement, survivor, and disability benefits; they do not include Supplemental Security Income (SSI) payments, which are not taxable. Continue reading

Tax Filing Season Starts February 12

feb 12Although tax season usually starts in late January, this year, the tax filing season is delayed until February 12, 2021. The delayed start date for individual tax return filers allowed the IRS time to do additional programming and testing of IRS systems following the December 27, 2020 tax law changes that provided a second round of Economic Impact Payments and other benefits to many taxpayers. This programming work is critical to ensuring IRS systems run smoothly to minimize refund delays and ensure that eligible people will receive any remaining stimulus money as a Recovery Rebate Credit when they file their 2020 tax return. Continue reading