Category Archives: Tax Planning

401k rollover

Changing Jobs? Don’t Forget About Your 401(K)

401kOne of the most important questions you face when changing job is what to do with the money in your 401(k) because making the wrong move could cost you thousands of dollars or more in taxes and lower returns. Continue reading

preparation to sell business

Tax Considerations When Selling Your Small Business

selling businessSelling a small to medium-sized business is a complex venture, and many business owners are not aware of the tax consequences. Continue reading

retiring overseas

Avoiding Tax Surprises When Retiring Overseas

retirement abroadAre you approaching retirement age and wondering where you can retire to make your retirement nest egg last longer? Retiring abroad may be the answer. But first, it’s important to look at the tax implications because not all retirement country destinations are created equal. Continue reading

529 plan

Saving for Education: Understanding 529 Plans

saving for collegeMany parents are looking for ways to save for their child’s education, and a 529 Plan is an excellent way to do so. Even better is that thanks to the passage of tax reform legislation in 2017, 529 plans are now available to parents wishing to save for their child’s K-12 education, as well as college (two and four-year programs) or vocational school. Continue reading

seasonal worker

Tax Withholding for Seasonal and Part-Time Employees

Many businesses hire part-time or full-time workers, especially in the summer. The IRS classifies these employees as seasonal workers, defined as an employee who performs labor or services on a seasonal basis (i.e., six months or less). Examples of this kind of work include retail workers employed exclusively during holiday seasons, sports events, or during the harvest or commercial fishing season. Part-time and seasonal employees are subject to the same tax withholding rules that apply to other employees. Continue reading

tax return deadline

Tax Return Tips for Last-Minute Filers

tax return timeEarlier is better when it comes to working on your taxes, but many people find preparing their tax return to be stressful and frustrating and wait until the last minute. Complicating matters this year is tax reform and the newly-redesigned Form 1040. If you’ve been procrastinating on filing your tax return this year, here are eight tips that might help. Continue reading

unemployment tax break

Q & A: The $10,200 Unemployment Tax Break

Generally, unemployment compensation received under the unemployment compensation laws of the United States or a state is considered taxable income and must be reported on your federal tax return. However, a new tax break–in effect only for the 2020 tax year–lets you exclude the first $10,200 from taxable income. Here’s what you should know: Continue reading

capital gains tax

Capital Gains Tax on Sale of Stocks

capital gains taxApps like Robinhood make it easy for everyone to play the stock market. If you’re a retail investor who made money last year buying and selling stocks, you may owe capital gains tax when you file your tax return this year. If you lost money, you may be able to deduct that loss and reduce your income. Continue reading

second home ownership

Renting Out a Second Home

second homeIn general, income from renting a vacation home for 15 days or longer must be reported on your tax return on Schedule E, Supplemental Income and Loss. You should also keep in mind that the definition of a “vacation home” is not limited to a house. Apartments, condominiums, mobile homes, and boats are also considered vacation homes in the eyes of the IRS. Tax rules on rental income from second homes can be confusing, especially if you rent the home out for several months of the year and use the home yourself. Continue reading